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Carry your gun

Even at home. I admit, I’m horrible about this. When I get home from a day in the hot August sun, I want to take off all the heavy things and plop down in a comfy chair. Obviously, I need a comfy chair gun.

14 Responses to “Carry your gun”

  1. jimmie mason Says:

    I have one, its a s&w 686 plus. 7 shot 357 mag should do the trick.

  2. Grizzlyrider Says:

    Well, your at home. The majority of shooting there is shotgun work anyway. Shouldn’t be hard to grab your personal preference of gauge, choke and barrel length, while you trade jeans for stretchy pants.

  3. guy Says:

    Kahr P380, right front pocket.

    Even if it’s in a pair of ‘barely dressed’ cargo shorts I pull on as I stumble out of bed on Saturday morning.

    I have actual guns loaded in the house, but that one is always in my pocket.

  4. JTC Says:

    The part that puzzled me was about the guy who had beaucoup firearms stashed around the house but answered the door without one in hand. Can’t blame that on the boxer shorts, which is my standard house uniform. What good are guns you don’t have when you open the gates to the castle so to speak?

    You can be full nekkid and still know to have something in hand or in reach when you open up for an unknown. Weird story, and weird that the LEO -and Tamara- focused on being undressed as if that somehow automatically means unready.

    Somebody comes to the door even if you’re chilling in the hot tub, have something ready before you answer, just in case they’re not friendlies.

  5. Veeshir Says:

    I have a holster between the cushion and the side of my comfy chair.
    When I sit down I make sure the Sig SC250 (.45acp) slides easily in the holster.

  6. MrSatyre Says:

    When up and about, I’m always wearing my gun. Yeah, sometimes it’s a pain, esoecwhen I sit down in a narrower chair and either my gun or spare magazines catch on an armrest, but that’s life. And when I’m in the shower, there’s a gun in the vanity.

  7. Alien Says:

    I received an education several years ago regarding always wearing a gun on the far side of exterior doors, or when any door is opened, even in well fenced back yards, thanks to my then-neighbor’s German Shepherd, but operatng within the domicile has been problematic.

    I’ve wrestled with this because my house has no dress code, and as a result attire is frequently extremely casual and entirely random. Activities demonstrate not every “around the house” outfit has belt loops for a good belt and holster (for example, try changing your oil or replacing a garbage disposal while wearing a gun of any reasonable size).

    I (partially) resolved it with, among other things, maintaining a suitable device always close at hand in the form of a good velcro-closure duty belt with a holstered gun and carriers for spare mags and a Surefire (there are also a set of house and vehicle keys attached, just in case). It’s easy to wear or carry around and keep within reach, sometimes slung over a shoulder, set on the coffee table or hung over the back of an adjacent chair or doorknob, and takes only seconds to properly place around the waist when a need arises if it’s not already there.

    Pro tip: It’s a benefit if the belt has the capability to fit other adequately trained adult members of the household (which may require more effort devoted to dietary and exercise considerations than belt selection).

    While working outside – digging, mowing, etc. – the sartorially-dreaded fanny pack often gets the call; slower draw, sure, but it does protect the gun, can be slid around the waist to get it out of the way, mostly keeps sweat and dirt off it, has room for spare mags and contributes to a reduction in hysterical neighbor interactions.

  8. Pete Says:

    I have a little Ruger LC9 that fills the roll for me. It’s light enough to be held up by the drawstring on my shorts and -this is important- it doesn’t get in the way while rolling around on the floor with kids/ dogs/ wife. (not all of those happen at the same time, btw)

    As far as outside the house is concerned, I don’t really call it “armed”. If I’m wearing real pants, I’m also most likely wearing my sig P250. The exception is when I’m physically at work that’s chock full of hoplophobic types. It’s legal to carry pretty much anywhere here in Oregon, but I’d much rather just avoid that particular discussion with HR. Fortunately, I work from home most of the time.

  9. RCCJr Says:

    I find that a soft, neoprene belly band does the trick. I mostly work from home. In the morning stumble out of bed and get right to work in pajamas. Wrapping a belly band around my waist gives me a place to put my carry gun until I get cleaned up and dressed for the day.

  10. Ron W Says:

    @Pete, Seems some of your co workers need some sensitivity/ diversity training to assuage their prejudice and bigotry.

  11. Dave Says:

    Ruger LCP in a pocket holster, all the time. Sitting on the couch, mowing the yard, whatever.

  12. Andrew Says:

    Guy I knew had guns everywhere.
    No wife, no kids.

    One day I was over to visit and helped work on siding his house.
    After we were done, he showed me some pistol he’d just bought, and joking around, I said “gee, thanks” and pretended I was tucking it under my shirt.

    He smiled but had a pistol in each hand before I could even stand up.
    Fun times.

    One day he pulled me aside at work.
    “Did I let you borrow my Bersa .380?”
    Nope.
    “I can’t find it. Last time I saw it was when I visited friends out of town. Should I report it stolen?”

    I threw up my hands on that one.

    He found it a month later, it had fallen behind the tupperware tub he had full of holsters that was under his bed.

    He owned more guns at one time than I had owned total in my life.

    Well, up to that point.

  13. Lyle Says:

    I keep a 38 snubbie in the pocket of my bathrobe, so the only time I don’t have a gun on my person is when I’m in bed or in the shower and in both of those cases there’s one within two steps.

    It isn’t complicated.

  14. Robert Says:

    Back when I was first starting to understand firearms, necessity and the like, I read an interesting statistic; It said that 100% of home invasions happen at home. I am no mathematician but that seemed pretty high to me, so I started carrying one around the house. I live out a ways on a few acres with a long driveway and a large dog, so probably would have at least some notice, but maybe not.