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Number 3 will blow your mind

Joe on the internet:

The online world has returned to the day of yellow journalism like it was 100 years ago. The most sensational headlines of those days sold the most papers on the street. It wasnt until the transition of the subscription model that newspapers became somewhat trusted news sources. The subscription model of blogs and online news have been, at best, struggling and the quality is corresponding poor. Because sensationalism gets page views and page views mean advertising money, sensationalism wins over thoughtful analysis and thorough, accurate presentation of facts.

I’ve posited before that, likely, 80% of people get their news from clickbait. I think it still stands.

5 Responses to “Number 3 will blow your mind”

  1. HSR47 Says:

    The issue for newspapers is that the only thing people are willing to pay for is quality news/journalism, which in turn would require printing based on fact/data rather than ideological beliefs.

  2. mikee Says:

    Clickbait is one problem, ideological echo chambers are another.

    I, for one, welcome our future of never having any thoughts different from our own, that ever cross our line of sight on a website of our choosing.

    But I was really confused when Obama won, and even more confused when he won, again, because everything I’d been reading said he wasn’t gonna win.

    This time I have $100 on the Evil Witch of Chappaqua, Hillary Clinton, to win. Because after the inevitable, I’ll have $100 for alcohol to soak my sadness with.

  3. Phelps Says:

    The link text instantly reminded me of this gem from ancient times (circa 2000)

    http://joebird.bandcamp.com/track/what-joe-saw-on-the-internet

  4. Sigivald Says:

    Most people seem to prefer “us good them bad” sensationalism to “thoughtful analysis and thorough, accurate presentation of facts”.

  5. AndyN Says:

    TV news teasers were clickbait headlines long before anybody dreamed of getting news off the internet. “Stay tuned after this commercial and you may finally hear how many people died in that fire we gave you a brief glimpse of at the start of the broadcast.”