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I’m guessing mistakes are not unreasonable?

Further erosion of the fourth amendment:

The Supreme Court said Wednesday that evidence obtained after illegal searches or arrests based on simple police mistakes may be used to prosecute criminal defendants.

I have a feeling we’ll be seeing a lot more simple police mistakes.

6 Responses to “I’m guessing mistakes are not unreasonable?”

  1. Vote For David Says:

    You are not saying the police could be wrong, are you?

    Don’t you know how much effort and expense went into your prosecution?

    Why don’t you just sign this confession comrade?

    Are we really headed down the same path Russia trod almost a hundred years ago?

  2. tgirsch Says:

    I’m surprised this didn’t attract Xrlqy-Wrlqy.

  3. Tom Says:

    The good thing is that with all the funerals maybe the economy will turn around. I don’t watch TV anymore, so I have no idea if this has been covered in the news, doubt it, but this should be headlines everywhere. People are sick of gov goons, look at the case of the BART rider murdered by the jackboots. This should be bigger than Kelo.

    It really sad to see that we’ve become a country that simply pulls out an umbrella when we’re being pissed on, but I think that’s the case.

  4. Ken Says:

    Through the looking glass.

  5. Patrick Says:

    This has been coming for a few years, with other SCOTUS decisions leading the way.

    Basically everyone is too concerned about letting a single bad guy go free, and they’ve built up some pristine image of the police that’s more based on an ideal than reality.

    By definition, this will lead to more police dishonesty and corruption, for which the SCOTUS has provided no recourse. It would have been one thing if they set up some checks and balances on this, but I guess they’re leaving that to lawmakers for years down the road when they realize they have an ugly problem on their hands.

  6. straightarrow Says:

    Patrick said,”By definition, this will lead to more police dishonesty and corruption, for which the SCOTUS has provided no recourse.”

    Maybe not, but the 2nd amendment does provide recourse.