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“Burn that fucking house down”

Last night, I was catching wind that this Dorner character was surrounded. Then, the news was that police ordered the press and media away. And then, I knew. This was to be an execution. He was not going to make it out alive. The police burned him alive. At first, I was hearing reports that the fire was an accident from the tear gas but then the recordings surfaced.

Regardless of that, a man was alone in a cabin that was someone else’s property and, instead of waiting him out or doing, you know, police stuff, they set the place on fire. He had no hostages and was isolated and could have been waited out. Instead, he was burned alive. And the police destroyed an innocent third party’s property. Hope the owners have insurance.

Now, I’m not excusing Dorner or his actions but, at this point, he was still a suspect, entitled to due process, and effort should have been taken to get him alive. What the police did here was inexcusable. No time for due process when execution will do, I suppose.

Also, this one is going to fuel conspiracy theories for years.

77 Responses to ““Burn that fucking house down””

  1. Robert Says:

    Well, I happen to live in Riverside CA and I can tell you this: The cops here DIDN’T WANT HIM ALIVE. And it’s not for the reason you might think. It’s because of our system in CA. He’s a black man, He more than likely would have been found “Insane” and housed in a unit for a couple years then released.

    There was NO DOUBT that he killed 4 people. NONE of which were on his list. He lost credibility when he killed innocent officers. He lost credibility when he killed the family members of LAPD chief.

    IF he were in Texas and he was captured alive, this guy would have been on death row for about a year then DONE. Here in CA he’d have died of old age.

    This is Kalifornia and our problems are much bigger than this one worthless asshole.

  2. Robert Says:

    I suspect that the insurance agency may not pay, depending on how the policy is written.

  3. DonkeyShow Says:

    how much money was spent chasing him down?

  4. Jeff from DC Says:

    You can put that one on Uncle Sugar’s tab.

  5. Kasper Says:

    Paging Janet Reno…

    It only took what, 7 years for them to find out they fired pyrotechnic rounds at Waco. What’s the over/under on how long it takes the LAPD to find out?

  6. Todd S Says:

    I believe the over/under is 4 minutes after hell freezes over…

  7. Jeff from DC Says:

    In case no has pointed this out yet, all of this never would have happened if his background investigator did his fucking job when he applied. Crazy people do crazy shit. That’s science.

  8. John Richardson Says:

    Of course, we *assume* it was Dorner in there. The cops better hope the DNA test of the charred body confirms that it really is Dorner or there will be even more hell to pay.

  9. Richard Says:

    WTF was LAPD doing at Big Bear. That is not LA.

  10. Six Says:

    He could have left when the cabin caught on fire but he didn’t. I think you’ll find out that he ate his gun when it became apparent that his spree was over like the coward he was. Consider also the tactical situation. No one is going to risk Fire personnel trying to put out the flames and cops ain’t smoke eaters. They did what the situation called for. Induced him to come out and when he didn’t let things take their course. In the end it was Dorner’s choice.

  11. Tremaine Says:

    I wonder if the police would have put so much effort into killing this guy if he had just been a regular guy who killed some regular guys. My guess is not. Also. My tally is 5 totaled vehicles, 3 shot civilians, 1 burned cabin, and 1 burned and dead bad guy. Nice job law. Who was the real menace to society here?

  12. rickn8or Says:

    I guess Reverunts Al and Jesse will be arriving at LAX any time now…

    And the trial/court martial of the Fort Hood shooter is still on hold until it’s decided whether or not he can keep his beard.

  13. Chris L. Says:

    First off I do not condone what Dorner did in any way. He was a nut case plain and simple.
    Now what I want to know is why no one has even mentioned an investigation of the LAPD? Not one word from the press. The LAPD gunned down 3 or 4 innocent individual just because they were in pickup trucks. LAPD wanted him DEAD! I read (most) of his so called manifesto. He had a beef with his former employer and some of it seemed legit. His allegations didn’t seem very far fetched and fit with most complaints PD’s have. The LAPD is already know for its corruption. Why didn’t the Feds step in to at least try and get him first? Dorner didn’t even have to try and make the LAPD look like they had something to hide, LAPD did that all by themselves.
    The DOJ is investigating my local PD (Albuquerque Police Dept.) right now. We have had over 20 officer involved shooting in the last 18 month and numerous excessive force complaint. Yet nothing about a probe or investigation beside an in house LAPD “re-opening” of Dorner’s firing. This stinks of MURDER not a police manhunt!

  14. Sendarius Says:

    Typically insurance doesn’t cover non-criminal deliberate acts.

    From the transcripts of the radio traffic, the police DELIBERATELY burned the house down, and I am certain that they will claim that the act was NOT criminal – so I am betting homeowner insurance won’t pay out.

  15. John Says:

    I am not surpised, remember when the sage of reason and civility Gabe Suarez said “Second, police response to the law in question. A SWAT team is like a military unit. You can moan all you want about the militarization of the police and all of that but your tears will not change a thing. Get used to that theme, BTW. When I was on SWAT our view is that “We will always win….even if we have to burn down your entire house by bombing it….we will win”. Period.”

  16. Rob Says:

    This is Kalifornia and our problems are much bigger than this one worthless asshole.

    Yup. And one of your big problems seems to be that your police officers are assassinating people without any due process.

    In the end it was Dorner’s choice.

    After the cops shot up those two pickup trucks it became very obvious that Dorner wasn’t going to come out of this alive, whatever he did. The police were out to kill him, plain and simple. They were so trigger happy they TWICE failed to even check if they were trying to kill the right person or not.

  17. comatus Says:

    Well at least the light of classical learning has not gone out at the Police Academy. Somebody took that seminar on “Negotiating Strategies from The Nibelungenlied.”

    Not the Wagner one. The Burgundian one.

  18. Dann in Ohio Says:

    Hey, the could have brought a drone in and Hellfire-Missiled is a$$… without due process… I mean, that is Obama’s way… isn’t it?

    Dann in Ohio

  19. Old NFO Says:

    LAPD ‘assisting’??? And yeah, they were out to kill him, nothing less…

  20. Alien Says:

    LAPD chief says “we going to review his personnel situation and the facts surrounding his firing.”

    24 hours later LAPD burns the house down with – allegedly – him in it.

    Wonder how often former LAPD employees will want their personnel files reviewed….

    RE: insurance – my money’s on “out of luck.” Most policies have some sort of clause(s) dealing with riot, insurrection, government action related to, etc. and insurance companies are pretty good at finding ways not to pay. I suspect there’s grounds for a lawsuit against LAPD, especially since LAPD appears to have agreed to replace the pickup trucks they shot up, establishing a precedent of reparations for agency action, plus the recordings of radio transmissions calling for “burn this F***er down.” It’ll go on for years, probably.

    Just makes you want to move to California RFN, doesn’t it? Also makes you wonder how close to LAPD your local cop shop is, too….

  21. Bram Says:

    If the insurance pays – they will sue the LAPD. If insurance doesn’t pay, the owners will sue the LAPD.

    Either way, the city of LA will be buying a new cabin. No way will a jury hear the “burn it down” audio and not bill the city.

  22. Caleb Says:

    FFS, at least get your facts right, people. LAPD didn’t burn shit down, the responding agency was San Bernadino Sheriff’s Department. But please let’s not let facts get in the way of hating on cops in general and LAPD in specific.

  23. wastme Says:

    They were bringing in people. Just before the house was set on fire they brought a helicopter in with their version of special forces I guess. I guarantee you the LAPD was there. At first they said they were preparing to tear gas the place and then word got out that they used incendiary tear gas canisters. I don’t know what they used but I do know they didn’t want any witness that weren’t police. You know, they got that brotherhood thing going on where they don’t tell on each other.

    The LAPD reopened his case for smoke and mirrors. Do you really think they are going to go back and do a better job this time? If the LAPD wants to show the public what a great organization they are, there should be at least one officer being brought up on attempted murder charges. Seems like the citizens of LA would demand it unless they don’t mind cops going around shooting people for something to do.

    Another note. During the LA riots where the public’s safety was in danger the LAPD decided it was to dangerous for them and let the public fend for themselves until I guess the gangs got tired of raping and pillaging. Here they had one guy who wasn’t out after the general public, just police and their families, and they had every cop in california there.

    Just remember, they aren’t here to protect YOU. They just protect the “brotherhood” by telling lies, cheating, stealing, murder whatever it takes.

  24. Alien Says:

    Gee, thanks Caleb, I’m glad to know it wasn’t the pickup truck shooters in LAPD that burned the house down, it was the San Bernadino SO. It makes me feel sooooo much better to know a suspect was killed by people wearing light tan uniforms than dark blue ones.

    It’s been said “the largest gang is the cops.” Until that statement becomes demonstrably untrue, we’re all in danger. Maybe not in South Dakota, but certainly in South California and a lot of other places.

    Again, thanks for setting me straight on which gang of government thugs was responsible for the arson.

  25. Chris L. Says:

    An update…

    Just reported this morning on ABC news…..
    From the LAPD
    “The million dollar reward will NOT be paid because captured or convicted”

    Telling in the extreme

  26. Chris L. Says:

    “The million dollar reward will NOT be paid because Dorner was not captured or convicted”

  27. Suki Says:

    If nobody has posted the obvious ancient reference yet: http://youtu.be/g8D4AsLzlM0

  28. Jake Says:

    He was contained in a rural structure with no hostages involved. Starve him out. If he comes out shooting, then the police are justified in shooting back. If he’s shooting out of the building, then the police are justified in shooting back. Otherwise, he has the Right to surrender peacefully at any time, to submit himself to due process.

    There’s a very specific term for setting fire to a structure when someone is inside. It’s called murder.

    But let’s face it, we all know they never intended to take him alive, and were quite willing to murder him if he didn’t give them a legitimate excuse. LAPD proved that quite well when they started shooting at random pickups.

  29. John Smith Says:

    The police already use false charges of molestation to get the general public to turn on anyone they want to get. The police already use drones to spy on us. Why is it inconceivable that they would burn someone alive so that they won’t be able to testify against them?

  30. Caleb Says:

    Wastme, show me one credible source that says LAPD was involved in the final standoff. Just one.

    Allen – arson my ass. A panicked radio call from an unidentified deputy that occurred hours before the house burned down doesn’t prove anything other than someone has shoddy radio discipline. Using tear gas to force a suspect that is actively shooting cops out of a secure position is a pretty good tactic.

    It’s pretty repugnant to suggest that a bunch of deputies intentionally burned a guy to death just because they were lazy. But again, don’t let me interfere with your little anti cop hate fest.

  31. Jim Says:

    Caleb,

    Have you ever used canister tear gas?

  32. Some Guy Says:

    Look, no excuses for a psychopath on a rampage. Here’s the “but,” the police reaction to Dorner raises troubling questions about whether he was actually justified in killing policemen while they were “hunting” him.

    Dorner knew the police were coming to kill him. Not “arrest,” but kill. They were going to shoot on sight, and in fact, had done just that to three innocent people, already. The police were acting without oversight, outside the law, and had made clear they were bent on murder.

    If I was in that position, would I regard every policeman I saw as an imminent threat, and feel the need to kill them first, before they saw me or realized I was in the area?

    The person above that complained that a California judge might have let Dorner go was right, but for the wrong reason. I’m pretty “law and order,” but putting myself in that jury box, I might have a tough time convicting him for killing the police officers hunting him after the police had made it perfectly clear that they were going to kill him on sight.

    Either way, the way this played out makes it clear to me that police in California are above the law.

  33. SayUncle Says:

    Caleb, news sources say LAPD was imbedded, whatever that means.

  34. Caleb Says:

    I didn’t see that on KTLA, CNN, BBC, Wall Street Journal, or Reuters so I’m sort of wondering which news sources did report that LAPD was on the scene.

    Even so, SB Sheriff’s was pretty clearly the agency responsible for the raid itself, and the Reuters article Uncle linked doesn’t really support the allegations that the police intentionally burned the place down.

  35. SayUncle Says:

    I heard it on the radio this morning.

  36. SayUncle Says:

    Also my post doesn’t mention LAPD because when I wrote it, I was unsure due to conflicting reports

  37. Caleb Says:

    I’m not saying that LAPD wasn’t on the scene, they very well might have had some dudes there, it’s just not in any of the news reports I’ve read. And the reports that are available all clearly say that Sheriff’s SWAT/SERT was responsible for the actual breach and entry.

  38. Mike Says:

    OK, so they burned Dorner to death. Anybody surprised? The cops weren’t afraid of his guns; they were afraid of his mouth. The cops were out to protect the LAPD, which is why they shot first and asked no questions. For several days, the LAPD became (in effect) a death squad.

    God, what I wouldn’t give to find out that Dorner handed reams of documents to his attorney, to be released in the event of his death….

    Oh, BTW, in case nobody has mentioned this before: if the choice is between killing you and their welfare/safety/paycheck, cops will not hesitate to kill you. It puts the lie to the notion that police will honor their “Oath” in the event of unconstitutional dicta. Remember that, ’cause there’s gonna be a pop quiz on it in the not-too-distant future.

  39. HL Says:

    “Burn that fucking house down”

    Look, we can debate motive and who burned down which house, and which media outlet is to be believed, but FFS…there is irrefutable evidence that the deputy who uttered the above quote ended his sentence with a preposition.

  40. Diane Says:

    I think LE has some explaining to do. About 50,000 people were listening to the scanner traffic when the building was burned. I’m not anti-cop, but I know what I heard and what I saw on TV. The fire seemed to be a deliberate thing.

  41. Kevin Baker Says:

    Dorner was an avowed cop-killer, and worse, an ex-cop.

    There was never any doubt in my mind that he was ever going to see the inside of a courtroom. He was a dead man walking – period. When the Keystone Kops shot up a blue Tacoma carrying two Asian women, mistaking it for a grey Titan containing a large black man, my belief was vindicated.

    It isn’t right, but it sure as hell wasn’t unexpected.

    And now Mr. and Mrs. Average U.S. Citizen have even less reason to trust the Fuzz.

  42. Kirk Parker Says:

    Some Guy (#32), how could there possibly be a case for ethical jury nullification here, when Dorner started out by ambushing and murdering 2 people who weren’t posing the slightest risk to him? That’s Murder 1 right there…

  43. wizardpc Says:

    Caleb,

    There were 18,000 people listening to the live scanner feed from RadioReference.com when the San Bernadino dispatcher announced that there were two helicopters full of 20 LAPD SWAT members on their way to the location about two hours before it burned.

    I can’t help that it didn’t make it in to local news reports.

  44. Gerry Says:

    Sorry I don’t see Dorner giving up. Ex cop in jail isn’t going to have a lot of fun time with his new roomies.

    Ferret rounds cause fires as do flash bangs. I’m not surprised a wooden building caught fire. I remember the Philly Air Force and the MOVE fire. They don’t let fireman near builds with gunmen in them. Philly lost a fireman shot dead during the first MOVE raid.

    Don’t worry boys and girls, everybody got some crap to get of their boots on this one.

  45. Diane Says:

    Lots of stuff didn’t make the news reports. I think Dorner was hit before they burned the house down because there was talk of blood spatter and mattresses when they were using the robot on the house (on the scanner). I haven’t seen mention of that in the news.

  46. Caleb Says:

    Sorry WizardPC, but that’s a “citation needed” if I’ve ever heard one. Why would San Bernardino Sheriff’s call for a SWAT team from LAPD Metro division when their own SWAT team was on site?

    Show me a verified transcript and I’ll believe it, but just saying “18,000 people totally heard it on the scanner” isn’t evidence, it’s hearsay.

  47. bob r Says:

    “Why would San Bernardino Sheriff’s call for a SWAT team from LAPD Metro division when their own SWAT team was on site?”

    I have no desire to take a side in this little mini-debate but I _would_ like to point out that wizardpc did _not_ say the San Bernadino Sheriff’s department “called” for a SWAT team from LAPD Metro division. He said “… the San Bernadino dispatcher announced that there were two helicopters full of 20 LAPD SWAT members on their way…”.

    Announcing someone is coming is not remotely the same thing as _requesting_ that someone come. And it doesn’t say _anything_ about the *desirability* of said someone coming — either for or against.

  48. Sigivald Says:

    Six said: They did what the situation called for. Induced him to come out and when he didn’t let things take their course.

    Induced him to come out… by setting the place on fire?

    Yeah, well… that’s not exactly what we want police doing, is it?

    “Oh, hey, it might take a while to get this single, hostage-less person out of this place, or some risk or effort. Better just SET IT ON FIRE rather than simply waiting him out.”

    All the incentives there are bad.

    No. Just no.

  49. Caleb Says:

    He also didn’t say whether or not LAPD SWAT ever actually made it to the scene. Because that’s something that would have gone out over the radio too, “LAPD SWAT is on the scene”. I guess those 18,000 (or was it 50,000 people) listening on the police band missed that?

  50. Some Guy Says:

    Kirk,

    Thank you, I wasn’t clear enough in what I was saying. If Dorner had been arrested and charged for the first killings, I think he would have been convicted for the premeditated murder of an innocent girl and her boyfriend. He was dead guilty of first degree murder.

    That said, I think you’d have a hard time convincing a jury to convict on any of the police officers he shot once they started hunting him, since the police made it clear they intended to kill him, rather than arrest him.

  51. Phelps Says:

    From the linked article:

    Deliberately starting a fire, rather than waiting out the suspect, could be seen as an extreme measure.

    Extreme measure? I think it could be seen as murder. I’ve never heard of the “this is going to take a long time” exception. Once he was surrounded out there in the woods, he wasn’t an imminent threat to anyone.

  52. Some Guy Says:

    Also, it wouldn’t have been “jury nullification.” Any defense lawyer worth his salt would have pled the statutory defense of self-defense. He would use the publicly reported actions of the police to establish that Dorner was in reasonable fear for his life in every confrontation with a police force that had decided to kill him. The judge would then instruct the jury that they were free to determine that the defendant acted in self defense (for the cop shootings, not the original murders), and find him not guilty.

  53. Gerry Says:

    “Once he was surrounded out there in the woods, he wasn’t an imminent threat to anyone.”

    If your in his rifle range he’s still a threat.

  54. Diane Says:

    Caleb,

    I’m pretty sure that the Batcat robot used to tear the cabin walls down is owned by the LAPD. That means LAPD was on the scene.

  55. Jake Says:

    If your in his rifle range he’s still a threat.

    Which is a common danger in these kinds of standoffs.

    Oddly enough, the usual procedure is still containment and negotiation, rather than murder-by-arson.

  56. Diane Says:

    I think this piece of equipment is too expensive for most police departments: http://www.policemag.com/videos/channel/vehicles/2011/05/lapd-s-remotec-batcat-robot.aspx

  57. JKB Says:

    Well, he’d killed a 27 yr old police officer early in the final engagement but not one of the CA FW officers who first came upon him in Big Bear plus sent reportedly a lot more to the hospital (media tweets so possibly not accurate). There were later reports of them extracting at least one more officer using smoke and a truck to transport to waiting air ambulance helos. No way they were going to wait it out after taking casualties.

    Reading the live twitter? feed as it was happening over at Legal Insurrection, the LAPD reportedly had teams on aircraft waiting for the Riverside Sheriff’s request. It apparently came if the reports were accurate. I stopped reading the feed when they had him holed up.

    Not to mention, the eagerness to shoot up trucks without seeking to identify occupants pretty much signals that CA police had no interest in capture.

  58. harp1034 Says:

    Diana, they get grants from Homeland Security to buy things like that.

  59. wizardpc Says:

    Caleb: it’s not hearsay if I’m one of the people that heard it.

    Which I was.

  60. Caleb Says:

    Diane, there are actual photos of the vehicle used in the assault available online (http://radaronline.com/exclusives/2013/02/chris-dorner-lapd-cop-killer-final-minutes/ for example) that pretty clearly show a Sheriff’s insignia on the side of the demolition vehicle.

    Care to try again?

  61. SteveA Says:

    We don’t know that he did any of the things police have said he did. There was no trial and wont be one, so no evidence has been examined to determine if he was guilty or not.

    p.s. Caleb, you Sir are an ass.

  62. Caleb Says:

    @wizardpc – So since you’re such a keen listener, did you also hear dispatch announce that LAPD had arrived at the scene? Or did you just hear something about some SWAT guys in some helicopters somewhere?

    @SteveA – Yes I am, and I’m not ashamed of it. There’s a point to all of this, and the point that I’m trying to make is if we’re going to be critical of law enforcement in situations like this, we need to be certain that we’re getting our facts 100% straight, otherwise we look like a bunch of whacko conspiracy nuts. Going around the internet saying dumb shit like “LAPD committed arson” makes the person who says it look like a dumbass.

  63. wizardpc Says:

    When you hear hoofbeats, do you think zebras?

    It apparently doesn’t matter to you what I heard the dispatchers and deputies say.

  64. Ohio shawn Says:

    Nice weather we’re having, eh?

  65. Caleb Says:

    What you heard matters quite a bit, especially since what you claim to have heard runs contrary to the available reports. That’s why I want to know if you heard dispatch report that LAPD was actually on the scene, instead of just in some helicopters somewhere.

    The reason I’m asking is because if someone heard dispatch report LAPD was actually on scene, that would prompt more research on my part. The only thing I can find that puts LAPD SWAT on the scene is a report from TMZ, which is well, a report from TMZ with all the journalistic integrity that entails.

    The problem I’m having here is that everyone is so quick to jump to conclusions about this whole mess based on very little actual evidence. So when we as a blogging community just start sprouting half-truths and assumptions, we look like a bunch of basement dwelling whackos.

  66. bob Says:

    The problem with due process is that in CA there is no death penalty, I think that is why they just killed him the way they did. I think the biggest problem with what they did is that now crazy people will start using hostages to prevent getting burned up.

  67. Snackeater Says:

    Caleb–I don’t think that the officers on scene were lazy–I think they were pissed off at being made fools offor a week running. On national TV. And they wanted revenge.

    Reminds me of the North Hollywood bank shootout where the second perp was seriously wounded but still alive and the police just stood around, shooting the shit and refusing him medical attention. They just let him bleed out. And why? Because they’d been made fools of on national TV. Bunch of sniveling cowards.

  68. BenC Says:

    When I hear a group of people say words to the effect of “burn the house down” and the house soon thereafter catches of on fire I think it’s reasonable to jump to the conclusion that they set the fire.

  69. Disavowed With Honor Says:

    Having been a part of a SWAT team and Trained a few of them, I will say this about arrival on scene. If I were the SWAT Commander I would not broadcast that I had arrived on scene when I had the potential that my suspect could learn that information and prepare to repell boarders. That was generally done by word of mouth, or if it was on the radio it was done by “new code”. Lastly, if broadcast by radio it is generally done on restricted frequency which means 18,000, 50,000, 1,000,000, wizardpc, no wizardpc, would not have heard it. If they were en route… they arrived. Rest assured. I can speak from experience, knowledge, and training. I cannot answer as to their level of participation, however. I wasn’t there.

    As far as “burners”, they’re called that for a reason. Seven of them at the same time? That is called OVERKILL and very obviously increases the likelyhood of a fire especially when you consider the make up of the WOOD building. THIS IS LAPD SWAT and people who train with LAPD SWAT… These folks know what they are doing. It’s why our illustrious government go to them to learn and train. So I don’t think anyone can tell me with any reasonable certainty that this was an accident. Being flashbang certified (at one time) that is one of the FIRST training points. “Be careful about where you place the device, they can cause fires and injury if one is placed onto a person which will cause serious burns or if it’s placed on flammable materials… they’re likely to ignite”. So if just one can do that… imagine what seven can do. This was revenge through and through. This reminds me of the movie Dark Blue which is set in LA with the LA Riots as the backdrop. Yes it’s fiction. Yes it comes from somewhere. Yes I associate the two. Why? I’ve seen this behavior. I was always the guy in the movie with a conscience… you know… the one who got killed. That’s another reason for turning in my badge almost 2 years ago. I’d rather live and fight.

  70. Six Says:

    Sigivald
    If you read my comment closer you’ll see I didn’t say they set the place on fire deliberately. I said they tried to induce him to come out. Based on my 24 years as a cop it’s probable they used some form of irritant gas, most likely CS. That can cause fire in a wooden building. Once that happens the proper tactical response is to wait and see what happens next. We hope they surrender but if they don’t it’s their choice. What we don’t do is charge into the burning building or allow fire personnel to respond. See the earlier comment on Philadelphia. I agree with Caleb on this. Until something else comes out that convinces me of deliberate arson and complete disregard for human life I’m going to watch, wait and see.

  71. SayUncle Says:

    “Until something else comes out that convinces me of deliberate arson”

    Listen to the second link.

  72. Paul Says:

    Uncle… you do know how Bonnie and Clyde DIED, don’t you?

    Frank Hammer was not gonna take them alive after they had killed so many cops, some in very cold blood.

    So as for Dorner, I shed no tear. At least the lawyers won’t get a dime off the taxpayers.

  73. mariner Says:

    Echoes of Waco.

    “Everybody dies”.

  74. AK™ Says:

    “The roof, the roof, the roof is on fire..” Chris Dorner.

  75. comatus Says:

    I don’t know that he ever said any of those things, or wrote the manifestos. Those are a couple of the first things that would have been established at a trial. Everything I know about him comes from statements read by police at press conferences, and quotes from the press. That’s who tried him, and most of us accept both the testimony and the verdict. No problem with that?

    If “Kalifornia” can’t bring something that straightforward to trial, it’s time to turn in the keys.

  76. NUGUN Blog Says:

    Caleb,

    I love you…but let’s be honest. LAPD/San Bernadino, it’s basically like a guy calling his brother to help him take out the guy who had an affair with his wife. Granted it may not have been the LAPD per say, but it’s really the “greater Los Angeles police structure”.

    I think the fact the officers let loose on two vehicles of innocents shows huge huge HUGE issues of mis-conduct.

    I know cop down, and cops get very protective of their own. But I also know from personal experience, there are great cops and there are bad cops. And it gets dang hard for us average Joe’s to tell the difference.

    And when you have an agency known for its issues, and then they handle a situation list this in such a piss poor manner. Yes, I think the governor should be making heads roll.

    And I think most of the police chiefs of involved units should lose their chairs.

  77. NUGUN Blog Says:

    What will be horrific, is if by some chance a video comes out that shows the arrest that Dorner complained about. And if such a video appears, and it shows the victim being kicked in the head as Dorner claimed.

    Kiss LA good bye and buy some bags of marshmallows to roast on the flames. Cause the Rodney King riots will pale in comparison.

    (Perhaps the only saving grace would be the fact that Obama is in office and a personal call for calm and promise to handle the matter personally. Might prevent such riots.)

Remember, I do this to entertain me, not you.

Uncle Pays the Bills


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