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Speaking of failing to enforce gun laws

Richard Pollock:

A June 2016 Justice Department Inspector Generals report revealed that between 2008 and 2015 the U.S. Attorneys office considered prosecuting less than 32 people per year for lying on form 4473, the federal application to buy guns.

Seems the lack of enforcement is pretty systemic.

15 Responses to “Speaking of failing to enforce gun laws”

  1. Paul Says:

    Can’t forget the ones that WERE prosecuted on gun charges only to have them dropped . Or pardoned by the community organizer .

  2. FiftycalTX Says:

    Well, after they checked, the rest were FALSE DENIALS! Criminals are criminal, but they don’t necessarily have to be stoopid.

  3. Lyle Says:

    IF they believe that gun restrictions reduce crime (they don’t reduce crime of course, but the left says they do), AND IF they aren’t interested in prosecuting falsified applications, THEN it can only mean that they aren’t interested in reducing crime.

    Of course we already knew that. This is just another data point. Add that to Operation Fast and Furious, and you get confirmation right there. Add decades of their other behaviors and you have a cascade of proof– None of this has even been about crime or safety.

    In case there was any doubt; I’m not calling for strict enforcement of CGA ’68. I’m calling for repeal of the GCA ’68 on the grounds that, a) it is unconstitutional (and stupid) and, b) that it was passed under multiple, demonstrably false pretenses.

  4. JTC Says:

    I’m not bothered by failure to enforce their laws against those who break them so much as that their solution is to make more of them to oppress those who don’t.

  5. mikee Says:

    If even only 5% of the 100,000 annual 4473 failures were stoopid criminals trying to buy guns, a yearly removal of 5,000 criminals who want guns from the general population and relocating them to prison for up to 10 years might just have a positive effect on violent crime rates.

    I can see the headline now: “More prison time for paperwork gun law violations, despite decreases in gun violence nationwide.”

  6. JTC Says:

    How you gonna enforce laws against ghosts with guns?

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/california-mass-shooter-made-his-own-rifles/ar-BBF3NYq?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=mailsignout

    The incredible ignorance of and misinformation disseminated by these idiots is what leads to “old laws don’t work, we must make more laws” to further infringe our rights.

  7. Ron W Says:

    “I’m not bothered by failure to enforce their laws against those who break them so much as that their solution is to make more of them to oppress those who don’t.” –JTC

    There you have it! They want the law-abiding armed citizens oppressed and disarmed because criminals prefer unarmed victims.

    As history clearly demostrates:

    ONLY YOUR ENEMY WANTS YOU DISARMED

  8. Muzzle Blast Says:

    I’m confident that vigorous enforcement for lying on form 4473 in the legal cannabis states would require an order of magnitude increase in BATFE budgets/personnel and a tripling of national prison space to house all of these dangerous criminals. Ain’t gonna happen …

  9. rickn8or Says:

    Was one of those prosecutions the one that made it to SCOTUS where the Uncle and the Nephew were trying to get the Uncle a discount on a Glock and the only mistake was that the Uncle wrote the Nephew a check before the Nephew purchased it instead of after?

  10. KM Says:

    @Ron W – ONLY YOUR ENEMY WANTS YOU DISARMED

    This needs to be repeated often.

  11. Ron W Says:

    @KM, thanks! To borrow Jefferson’s phrase from the Declaration of Independence, it’s “a self-evident truth” that has been demonstrated down through history.

  12. Fûz Says:

    Hmmm. Rates of denials during Obama administration plummeted. In part I attribute this to the wave of panic-buying by lawful people. Quantifiable by looking at overall purchase numbers before vs during The Won’s presidency.
    In another part, Holder/Obama intentionally wanted more guns in the hands of felons, to provoke a big mess.
    Yet another part, many of the non-prosecutions were over anticipated false denials. This should be quantifiable.

    Does a lie on the 4473 fall under the same Fed section as lying to the FBI, a la Manafort and Papadopoulos and Martha Stewart?

  13. Sigivald Says:

    If we look at the actual report, we see a few things:

    1) Over 6 years, half a million or so denials; round it to 100,000 a year.

    2) Of a spot check of a decently sized sample, they found a nearly-zero (.2%) false-denial rate, which is excellent news.

    3) It appears that ATF and FBI disagree on what “fugitive from justice” means, which sometimes matters.

    4) “USAOs most often prosecuted NICS denial
    cases when aggravated circumstances existed in addition to the prospective purchaser’s false “no” answer to at least one question on the Form 4473”

    The latter seems the important part.

    Do we want someone with a misdemeanor conviction and “time served” but finds out they’re Legally A Felon For NICS Purposes Because The Maximum Sentence Was Over A Year to get prosecuted by the Feds? I say no, both as a matter of basic justice and of efficient use of limited resources.

    I mean, it’s easy to “lie” on a 4473 without knowing you’re doing it!

  14. rickn8or Says:

    “Do we want someone with a misdemeanor conviction and “time served” but finds out they’re Legally A Felon For NICS Purposes Because The Maximum Sentence Was Over A Year to get prosecuted by the Feds? I say no, both as a matter of basic justice and of efficient use of limited resources.

    Which could explain the miiitary’s reluctance to report UCMJ offenses to NICS.

  15. Joe Huffman Says:

    There is another angle of potential interest to the lack of prosecution.

    What this means is that if someone who can legally own firearms were to use a fake/borrowed/stolen ID to purchase firearms they could end up owning firearms with no paper trail with a very low risk of getting prosecuted if they were caught. Go to a different state, walk a few blocks to avoid cameras catching your license plate, visit a gun store they have never been to before, and pay cash, then the odds are good that unless the seller inspects the ID really close once the buyer walks out the door the buyer will never be caught.