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Daughter of slave to vote for Obama

Ya know, I’m no fan of Obama. But this is still a pretty cool story: Were within one lifetime (albeit a really long one) of slavery and a black man could be elected president next week.

10 Responses to “Daughter of slave to vote for Obama”

  1. Trey Says:

    Interesting. Now Senator Obama is descended from Arabic Africans. Weren’t they the ones that sold the slaves to the Arab world? He is not related to victims of slavery as far as we know. Is he descended from slave traders?

    Trey

  2. countertop Says:

    In any case, that is a touching story, but one thing struck me as funny.

    Jones’ father herded sheep as a slave until he was 12, according to the family, and once he was freed, he was a farmer who raised cows, hogs and turkeys on land he owned. Her mother was born right after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed, Joyce Jones said. The family owned more than 100 acres of land in Cedar Creek at one point, she said.

    If her mother is 109, then she was born in 1898 or 1899.

    The first emancipation proclamation was signed on September 22, 1862.
    The second was signed January 1, 1863.
    The 13th Amendment was ratified on December 18, 1865.

    Now, I’m not disputing that she is the daughter of a slave. That could certainly be the case. But, 36 or 37 years later can hardly be considered being born RIGHT AFTER the emancipation proclamation was signed.

    For that matter, if her father was 12 when slavery ended (and taking the latest date – December 18, 1865) that would make him 45 when she was born certainly possible. But it also strikes me that there could be a large number of other children born to former slaves also voting.

    Say a child was born in 1860. They would have been born into slavery and be 3 years old when that terrible institution ended. If that child grew up and had a child at the age of 50 (something that isn’t unheard of) in 1910, then their child would be 88 years old this year. If it was a man and they had a child at 60 years of age (1920) then that child would be 78 years old this year). Granted, the 3 year old slave probably couldn’t rely to his children the horrors of slavery as the 12 year old could, but the point is still the same – I suspect there are many others in this woman’s situation.

    Someone should try to do a larger story on the phenomona. Its certainly worthy of a NY Times Magazine Article.

  3. Breda Says:

    I’m a daughter of a woman! A woman might be elected vice president next week!

    Women, by the way, haven’t been able to vote as long as African American men. So, yay US.

    Identity politics, hoo-fucking-ray!

  4. john Says:

    Countertop, the voter in the article was born in 1898 or 1899. Her mother could very well have been born in 1860.

  5. countertop Says:

    John

    Its her mother who is the voter in the article – or at least thats how I read it. The mother – who is 109 years old was born in 1898 or 1899. Her daughter – Joyce Jones – is only 68 (the granddaughter of slaves, to be sure).

  6. Manish Says:

    Is he descended from slave traders?

    Im a daughter of a woman! A woman might be elected vice president next week!

    The stupid, it hurts.

  7. straightarrow Says:

    Your arithmetic is wrong. Born in 1910 would make her 98. Same ten year mistake for 1920. my mother was born in 1923 and she just turned 85.

  8. straightarrow Says:

    You just miss a lot, don’t you Manish?

  9. Smacklug Says:

    Yeah, if you don’t recognize just the fact that there is a viable black candidate as a positive milestone you’re retarded, regardless of whether you agree with his policies or not.

  10. straightarrow Says:

    Smacklug, I understand your premise, and would normally agree. But given the paltry choices we have, I am not sure that this is a milestone that moves us forward. I don’t care that one is black or nearly so, and one is white or probably so, that both of them are so lacking in any virtues that the nation could benefit from is, to my mind, not progress.